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Plastics in Packaging

опубликовал статью о "ПОФ-ФЛЕКСО"

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В августовском номере европейского журнала Plastics in Packaging опубликована статья о "Полиграфоформление-ФЛЕКСО". Материал был подготовлен директором британского марктетингового агентства Элисон Кокрел, которая посетила предприятие в рамках мероприятия "День клиента-2012" в мае. Европейские читатели познакомились с историей, производственными возможностями компании и планами развития продуктового ассортимента, а также тенденциями российского рынка гибкой упаковки.

 

From Russia with love

by Alison Cockrell

Plastics in Packaging, August 2012

The Russian packaging market is facing a revival following the difficult recessionary period during 2008-2009 and together with developing economies in adjacent countries there are many opportunities on offer. One company seeking to benefit from this is the converted flexible packaging producer Polygrafoformlenie- FLEXO, which recently hosted a Customer Day to present its capabilities and innovations to key clients as well as give a plant tour.

Located south-west of St Petersburg, and close to the city’s Pulkovo airport, it is hard to miss Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO’s distinct red, yellow and blue building. The company has a long history of which its employees are immensely proud. Founded by Eduard Markus in 1879, it is believed to be the very first packaging company in Russia. In its early days it supplied high quality cartons and paper for chocolates and cigarettes and was even an official supplier to the

Russian royal family. Four years after it was privatised in 1994, Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO began to incorporate film-based substrates such as bi-oriented polypropylene, polyethylene and polyester, into its flexible packaging converting activities (although it does not extrude film itself). Originally the firm had a city centre location but with little room to expand it relocated in 2006 to its present site where there is plenty of space to grow for its 300 employees as well as good infrastructure for utilities.

Part of the holding company Polygrafoformlenie, whose other packaging interests include labels and shrink sleeves producer Aleska POF and a minority stake in carton makers MM Poligrafoformlenie Packaging LLC (part of Mayr-Melnhof Group), Polygrafoformlenie- FLEXO now ranks among the leading players in the Russian flexible packaging market. Steady investment in recent years means that the company can boast a versatile array of equipment.

From a printing standpoint this comprises six flexo presses, five of which are able to print up to eight colours, whilst the most recent – a Fischer & Krecke press – can print up to 10 colours as does a Cerutti 10-colour gravure press. The company also has eight laminators that produce structures (up to quadruplex) via both hot lamination (including wax deposition) and adhesive lamination (solvent and solventless) and a bank of Kampf slitting machines. The design department takes care of all pre-printing processes. Because of the sheer size of the Russian market, Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO, like many local packaging companies, enjoys most of its sales within its home market.

“Around 75-80 per cent of our sales are within Russia and our customers are located anywhere between Western Russia and Siberia,” explains Rashad Ismailov, the company’s sales director. But other countries are also served, many of these being neighbouring states that were once part of the former Soviet Union, such as Belarus, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Armenia, Moldova and Latvia. Given the significance of the Russian confectionery market with both indigenous and international groups having sizeable production operations there, it is hardly surprising that this application features strongly in the company’s portfolio.

“Confectionery is by far our biggest market,” continues Ismailov. “And our company has a solid share in this sector. We have well known confectionery names such as Nestlé, Orkla and Perfetti Van Melle as customers and anticipate supplying other large groups. However, the tea and coffee, ketchup and mayonnaise and household cleaning as well as personal care markets are also important to us. We also intend to target the dairy, cheese, meat and fish markets with specific types of packaging.”

So how does the future look for the Russian flexible packaging converter sector? According to Polygrafoformlenie’s owner and general director, Maxim Yakovlev, many Russian converters are not sufficiently specialised and are ‘generalists’. Coupled with the fact that Russia is still a young market, operating with low gross margins, he believes that it will see consolidation in the sector leading to a decrease in the number of companies. Yakovlev is determined that Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO will not be part of this and has a number of plans for the company over the next five years. These include securing its position through innovation and specialisation in niche markets. Although reluctant to reveal details on the latter point he did acknowledge that this would involve the development and commercialization of more complex high-added-value structures. Improvements in efficiency also need to be addressed.

“In the West European flexible packaging industry there is higher efficiency with an average contribution of €200,000 ($251,000) per employee. In Russia the average contribution is €70,000 ($88,000) per employee and despite the fact that we do better than the Russian average there is still considerable room for improvement at Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO. And it is not just production that needs to be examined – there is scope to increase efficiencies in all processes within the business.”

Business improvements, however, often come at significant financial cost. Nevertheless the company shows no signs of procrastinating and intends to further invest in lamination equipment and finished processing as well as business process improvement such as upgrading software and automation. The company intends to grow organically, at least in the foreseeable future. Asked what the company’s motto might be Yakovlev immediately replied: “To serve people well”. Understood to reflect its attitude towards customers, suppliers and employees, these are wise words indeed.

Article by kind permission of Plastics in Packaging

www.plasticsinpackaging.com

 


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Plastics in Packaging © 2012 Sayers Publishing Group • August

 

From Russia with love. 

 

The Russian packaging market is facing a revival following the difficult recessionary period during 2008-2009 and together with developing economies in adjacent countries there are many opportunities on offer. One company seeking to benefit from this is the converted flexible packaging producer Polygrafoformlenie- FLEXO, which recently hosted a Customer Day to present its capabilities and innovations to key clients as well as give a plant tour.

Located south-west of St Petersburg, and close to the city’s Pulkovo airport, it is hard to

miss Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO’s distinct red, yellow and blue building. The company has a long history of which its employees are immensely proud. Founded by Eduard Markus in 1879, it is believed to be the very first packaging company in Russia. In its early days it supplied high quality cartons and paper for chocolates and cigarettes and was even an official supplier to the

Russian royal family. Four years after it was privatised in 1994, Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO began to incorporate film-based substrates such as bi-oriented polypropylene, polyethylene and polyester, into its flexible packaging converting activities (although it does not extrude film itself). Originally the firm had a city centre location but with little room to expand it relocated in 2006 to its present site where there is plenty of space to grow for its 300 employees as well as good infrastructure for utilities.

Part of the holding company Polygrafoformlenie, whose other packaging interests include labels and shrink sleeves producer Aleska POF and a minority stake in carton makers MM Poligrafoformlenie Packaging LLC (part of Mayr-Melnhof Group), Polygrafoformlenie- FLEXO now ranks among the leading players in the Russian flexible packaging market. Steady investment in recent years means that the company can boast a versatile array of equipment.

From a printing standpoint this comprises six flexo presses, five of which are able to print up

to eight colours, whilst the most recent – a Fischer & Krecke press – can print up to 10 colours

as does a Cerutti 10-colour gravure press. The company also has eight laminators that produce

structures (up to quadruplex) via both hot lamination (including wax deposition) and adhesive

lamination (solvent and solventless) and a bank of Kampf slitting machines. The design department takes care of all pre-printing processes. Because of the sheer size of the Russian market, Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO, like many local packaging companies, enjoys most of its

sales within its home market.

“Around 75-80 per cent of our sales are within Russia and our customers are located anywhere between Western Russia and Siberia,” explains Rashad Ismailov, the company’s sales director. But other countries are also served, many of these being neighbouring states that were once part of the former Soviet Union, such as Belarus, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Armenia, Moldova and Latvia. Given the significance of the Russian confectionery market with both indigenous and international groups having sizeable production operations there, it is hardly surprising that this application features strongly in the company’s portfolio.

“Confectionery is by far our biggest market,” continues Ismailov. “And our company has a solid

share in this sector. We have well known confectionery names such as Nestlé, Orkla and Perfetti

Van Melle as customers and anticipate supplying other large groups. However, the tea and coffee, ketchup and mayonnaise and household cleaning as well as personal care markets are also important to us. We also intend to target the dairy, cheese, meat and fish markets with specific types of packaging.”

So how does the future look for the Russian flexible packaging converter sector? According to

Polygrafoformlenie’s owner and general director, Maxim Yakovlev, many Russian converters are not sufficiently specialised and are ‘generalists’.

Coupled with the fact that Russia is still a young market, operating with low gross margins,

he believes that it will see consolidation in the sector leading to a decrease in the number of

companies. Yakovlev is determined that Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO will not be part of this and has a number of plans for the company over the next five years. These include securing its position through innovation and specialisation in niche markets. Although reluctant to reveal details on the latter point he did acknowledge that this would involve the development and commercialization of more complex high-added-value structures. Improvements in efficiency also need to be addressed.

“In the West European flexible packaging industry there is higher efficiency with an average

contribution of €200,000 ($251,000) per employee. In Russia the average contribution is

€70,000 ($88,000) per employee and despite the fact that we do better than the Russian average

there is still considerable room for improvement at Polygrafoformlenie-FLEXO. And it is not just production that needs to be examined – there is scope to increase efficiencies in all processes

within the business.”

Business improvements, however, often come at significant financial cost. Nevertheless the company shows no signs of procrastinating and intends to further invest in lamination

equipment and finished processing as well as business process improvement such as upgrading

software and automation. The company intends to grow organically, at least in the foreseeable

future. Asked what the company’s motto might be Yakovlev immediately replied: “To serve people well”. Understood to reflect its attitude towards customers, suppliers and employees, these are wise words indeed.